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Patrick Landrum, Interior Designer,
PL&D/Patrick Landrum Design

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Introducing “Domicile Diagnostics” ™ Self Health for the Sad House




Sad window house
via thespiritscience.net



It’s a brand new year and I bet you’ve made some resolutions…and maybe even broken a few by now too right?

January 1st brings out the best and the worst of us all it seems, or should I say January 2nd brings out the best, but by the 31st  it’s all downhill … Lose weight,  quit smoking, get out of debt, cut back on booze… these are certainly excellent ambitions…

But what about less measurable resolutions?

Getting organized
Staying in touch, and spending more time with family and friends
Enjoying life more
Exercising
Eating healthier
Being more productive
Reducing stress
Getting more sleep
Feeling better/more positive about yourself/outlook


Chicken healthy meal
via .njbariatricsurgery.com/ 

One of the most important factors negatively effecting your success rate at these lofty goals may be staring you right in the face…in fact it may be surrounding you right now.

What on Earth could it be you ask…well it’s your home environment

We know about radon and carbon monoxide and few will argue that the winter blues doesn’t actually exist, but repeated exposure to spaces that do not inspire us can be detrimental to your mental health and in turn manifest in physical symptoms.


via theodysseyonline.com

Introducing “Domicile Diagnostics” a simple self evaluation of your home and how you feel about it that will give you an idea of just what may be ailing you.

I can’t claim this as science but I can tell you that I have been in the Interior Design field since I changed my major at The University of Texas to Interior Design when I was 22.  I began as an assistant designer while still working on my degree and stayed with the same company for 10 years, and then started my own firm over 20 years ago…so I have seen it in action.

A bit tongue in cheek, these questions may seem silly, but answer them honestly and you will learn more about yourself and the spaces you inhabit than perhaps you care to…but the good news it can all be changed.

To get started take a few minutes to read through the following statements and questions.

1. Would you rather set your fireplace on fire than light a fire in it?


Burning chimney
via ctsweep.com


2. Does your stair railing look more like jail bars than a safety feature and make you feel trapped?

3. Are your chair and sofa cushions more like pancakes than marshmallows?

4. Are your pillows just tired deflated beach balls out of season?





5. Take a look at your accessories… are they all close to the same height, or size in general. Do you even know why they are what they are, when and why you acquired them? Do you like them, and if you didn’t own them now would you purchase them if you saw them at the store?

6. If you saw your art in a gallery would you smile or vomit and wonder what they were thinking?

7. How many material or color floor transitions can you see within a 360 degree view not counting rugs, and tile or wood borders? Are any of the transitions wider that 36”

8. Do you suffer from Houzz envy

9. Are you ashamed of your naked lonely windows?


Wilde Art quote


10. Is your carpet stained and covered with a rug, or is there a carpet/rug stained and covered by furniture that can’t be moved?

11. Are you feeling exposed…to the neighbors, to the sun or wind or cold?

12. Is it time for some “real” furniture

13. Has Granny’s old sofa come full circle and is back in style, but you don’t like it any more the second or third time around than the first?

14. Do you avoid having friends over because you are unhappy with your home, or worse… embarrassed?

15. Is it a struggle or a joy to prepare meals in your kitchen


Hideous kitchen
Dysfuntional ugly kitchen before via PL&D/Patrick Landrum Design


16. When you wake up in the morning do you feel like it’s a beautiful day or the end of the world





17. You look pretty damn good with your new do and new outfit, but that bathroom reflected in the mirror is so hideous it all becomes meaningless

18. When was the last time you actually took a bath in the master tub

19. You can’t wait to get out of the house in the morning, and put off going home as long as possible

20. Are you laughing or crying right now






I bet I got a chuckle or two out of you didn’t I? Read the list again and look around you…How many of these ‘absurdist” little questions hit so close to home, they’re right inside it, home…your home!

Then grab a piece of paper and jot down exactly what goes through your mind as you read them and look around. Think of it as 20 questions for the house, and be sure not to edit…

I guarantee you will be shocked, surprised and maybe a bit annoyed that you’ve let things go this far. I also guarantee you that you have made a huge step forward in creating a plan to improve your and your family's life.

Stayed tuned for the next post where we will discuss how these things chip away at our happiness, little by little, day by day and what we can do to fix them! 

"The Twelve Days of Interior Design"



Interior Design by PL&D
(Please click on photo to enlarge)



On the 1st day of Christmas 
my True Love gave to me

a brand new room from P, L, and D!


On the 2nd Day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 3rd day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...three assorted chairs, two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 4th Day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...four toddies by the hearth, 
three assorted chairs, two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 5th Day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 6th day of Christmas, my true love gave to me...
six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, 
three assorted chairs, 
two comfy sofas...and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 7th day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves.....

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, 
two comfy sofas...and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 8th day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
eight drapery panels, seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, 
two comfy sofas...and a brand new room from P, L, and D!


On the 9th day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
nine feet of tables, eight drapery panels, seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, 
two comfy sofas...and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 10th day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
ten solar shades, nine feet of tables, eight drapery panels, seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, 
two comfy sofas...and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 11th day of Christmas my True Love gave to me...
eleven well placed accents, ten solar shades, nine feet of tables, eight drapery panels, 
seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!

On the 12th day of Christmas, my true love gave to me...
twelve feet of area rug, eleven well placed accents, ten solar shades, 
nine feet of tables, eight drapery panels, seven sexy throw pillows, six built-in bookshelves...

five lithographs framed........

four toddies by the hearth, three assorted chairs, two comfy sofas...
and a brand new room from P, L, and D!


Merry Christmas, Happy Hanukkah, and Season's Greetings Everyone, 
and the most Joyous of New Years!

"Holiday Decorating Tips and Tricks"




The holidays will always be one of my favorite times of year and I'm looking forward to all the good food, great friends and of course decorating the house and tree.

I'm fortunate enough to have several clients for whom I do the holiday decorations, and one of my favorite client quotes is "I love it when you make Christmas happen" which she always exclaims in one medium or another upon arriving home after I have been at the house installing.

I have been doing homes for the holidays professionally for over 25 years, and participated in numerous Holiday Showhomes, and fundraisers over the years and here I'm going to share some of my basic tips and tricks to get your holiday decorating plan moving. Or if you've already decorated, perhaps a little tweaking is in order....and you should always plan for next year too, since the leftover items will be drastically reduced after the 25'th!

1. It doesn’t have to be a Christmas tree- it can be Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, or Chrismakwannukah or anything else you want it to be. 

Kurt Adler Dreidel Ornament


THE MKEKA, MSHUMAA, KINARA, AND MUHINDI MAKE UP THIS KWANZAA TABLE

2. It isn't just red and green for the Holidays anymore! Feel free to use the colors of your year round decor to create wonderful holiday festivity, or just pic coordinating colors and have fun!

Chartreuse, lavender,and pink add a retro vibe to this Holiday tree.

3. It’s ok to have a tree with no decorations other than lights. A prelit artificial tree can be a beautiful simple symbol of the holidays. 

4. Pick a theme for your tree and use 5-9 (for a 6-7 ft tree) ornaments within the theme per 1/4 side of the tree. Then stop in at a local store and grab boxes of coordinated colored glass balls (often at 1/2 off!) to fill in the empty spaces. Then add some garland or ribbon or even tulle fabric to complete the tree.. 

    Musical instrument themed trees, old 45 records, designer shoes, bowties, eyeglasses, toys …,Be creative. Ornaments are available to fit every theme, or try household items like kitchen utensils, perfume bottles etc.

5. Ribbon, bows, and simple glass balls make a beautiful tree if you are just starting your family, or this is your first tree. Many family traditions include purchasing an ornament for each family member every year to add to the tree.


6. Fill glass bowls, and vases with multicolored glass balls to carry the color and sparkle around the room.

via realsimple.com


   7. Pick focal points around your rooms, and add small "vignettes" of decorations, based on the theme of your tree. This little bit will create continuity, and mentally remind your subconscious of the tree. Colored bows, sprigs of greenery, glass balls all work well.

via realsimple.com


via .errigalhotel.com

  8. Add sprigs of greenery, bows, and other size appropriate items to your chandeliers, balconies, and stair railings. Swagged garland is a favorite for stairs!

via blog.styleestate.com

9. Remember to add timers for indoor and outdoor lighting, (savings can be big!).

10. Don't forget your sense of smell! Mix live with artificial garland if your allergies can stand it. There is nothing like the smell of fresh cut Christmas greenery to set the stage for Santa! If live is too much for you, artificial is great but include candles in bayberry, cinnamon, peppermint, and winterforest throughout the home!

There are also several wonderful non aerosol sprays available now. Stay away from supermarket fragrances ie. Glade, etc., as they smell artificial, and like you are trying to cover something up.

11.  Don't throw away all your older decorations. Sift through and see what you can reuse. Usually at least 25% of the old stuff can be redesigned.

12.  Enjoy the Love, Beauty, Wonder, and Glory of the Season! 






Not Just Your Ordinary Review of Pantone's Color of the Year 2016



via pantone.com



   PANTONE announced their “Color of the Year 2016" last week (COTY) and surprise- it’s a blend of two colors. Interesting that they picked a combo of two colors.... and as I read it they mean them to be used together- yen/yang- gender neutral. Will this be their new norm, or is it a nod to offset what some have felt were arguably feminine colors from the past few years... or an homage to social progress?

   If you know me, my work and my clientele, you’ll know I don’t follow trends. I’m definitely aware of them, but more often than not I’m a trendsetter, or according to houzz.com an influencer… perhaps more accurate since I am usually two- three years ahead of the curve.

   Now this can be good or annoying depending on the particular trends in power keeping the masses enthralled at any given moment due to the available materials, goods and merchandise.

   My clients don’t follow trends either. Many are VPs and executives in various industries, CEO’s and founders of their own companies, several are specialists at one thing or another at the top of their fields.  Many are very private, some even reclusive, and all of them are interested in expressing their own individuality and creating the rules instead of playing by them. SO… what exactly is this post about? It’s all about commerce, the heart of what Pantone is really all about, just as reported in The Wall Street Journal piece "Why Pantone released two colors of the year".

The living room above belonged to a client who is a leading cancer oncologist and his wife and completed in the early 2000's.  The color scheme was taken from a favorite watercolor by a well known Asian artist that was given to them as a wedding present.  I was very careful what potential clients saw this project because one once commented with disdain that the colors were too 80's. This entire home was also my first multi-million dollar new construction. 

   I've been fascinated by Pantone’s color predictions and selections since college. I also love the effect of words on different individuals. So despite Pantone’s emphatic claims that it’s not baby pink and little boy blue, most people see it as so. You can call any color whatever you want, but it’s what the beholder sees that is the reality. It’s also pastel…1980's Miami Vice Crockett and Tubs Pastel…

via nbc.com


   Despite Pantone's statements it’s not anything new for men to wear pink in the mainstream either. Ralph Lauren had wildly popular Polo shirts in pink with blue stripes and vice versa in 1980, and preppy regimental stripes and rampant lion ties to boot. And according to some historians pink was for boys and blue for girls in the early 1900's So that gender neutral thing is a crock too. It’s just savvy marketing to capitalize on dramatically changing social acceptance. 

   Pantone has always claimed that color is representative of a cultures attitude and overall state over time, and rightly so. Take a look back over the last 50 years and see how spot on this claim really is. Of course hindsight is what it is, and actually predicting how a color will fare is not a science. Take 2015’s COTY Marsala and it’s miserable welcome from most everyone in the design world, especially interior designers.









Images above via Crossville Tile
Cross Color Mingles Porcelain Stone
Mica, Rosewood, Atlantic Grey


   Interestingly COTY 2016 likely ushers in a period of dusty pastels that promises to last the next decade. If you review COTY  back to 2007 you will see a definite pattern of bright saturated hues, then Marsala in 2015… a color that goes with everything before it, and I suspect everything after, signaling the subconscious need to redecorate… perhaps slowly integrating a new color each year, or a full fledged redesign. Check out also 2000- 2006 where Sand Dollar was the transitional color.

   I’m not going to go out on a limb and formally claim last years choice Marsala was an intentional lead in to this years color(s) but it if I were trying to give the public a nudge to change that’s how I would do it. Commerce baby… and for me it’s all good fun to read all the posts on how to incorporate the COTY into your home, and watching the products filter out… but my clientele doesn’t give a damn about Pantone’s Color of the Year… and aside from from the study of human nature and marketing, I don’t either. Good design is about what you love and what brings joy and function into your life.

  I say it’s good fun indeed… I predicted in my #watchlist2015 that classic suiting patterns such as herringbione, pin-stripe, houndstooth, and Glen plaid would be huge in fabric and wallpaper, and by end of year would segue from greys, navy, black and brown into pastels… watch for it...I am confident I'm on target here, not that it's particularly important... though I do enjoy being right!

  But then again….the dusty pastel hues of Rose Quartz and Serenity are a wonderful introduction to my “Texas Hill Country Trail Paint Color Palette” I plan to premier this Spring…

Hmmmm… maybe I should give a tiny little damn after all!

Downton Abbey Style, The Essence of an Era

Downton Abbey Cast
via pbs.org

     Having taken the television audience by storm on both the old and new continents, the elegance, opulence, and grandeur of Downton Abbey is influencing residential interior design across the globe.

   Filmed on location at Highclere Castle, Newbury, England, the Edwardian style interiors speak of a bygone era with walls, furniture and furnishings that could tell stories that would shock, amuse and break your heart. Rich woods, glowing crystal, lavish use of silk brocade, damask, and velvet fabrics, tooled leather, layers of texture, color… and the furniture…who wouldn't love it!
   Even those with a more modern bent find something to love here. Perhaps it's the stark contrast of mahogany and oak against softer cream and pastel walls, or the gentle oversized geometric that’s formed by the damask fabrics that catches the modernist’s eye. Classicist's have an overabundance of inspiration here, and the eclectic need only let his gaze dart from one period piece to another and wonder what their story is.  

  The series’ popularity has fueled demand for all things “Downtonian” from furniture, bedding, and lighting, to kitchen accessories, and even formal wear. Kelly Moore Paint Company has issued colors inspired by the historic home, as has Farrow and Ball who also offers wallpaper suggestions. Knockout Licensing, the company overseeing and licensing the “Downton Abbey Brand” with manufacturers appropriately aligned will soon have many more companies creating lovely inspired items for the kitchen, dining, bedroom, and more. There most certainly will be lovely pieces within these new collections

   Downton Abbey style is surprising easily incorporated into the modern home. That is the purpose of today’s blog…an introduction to the basic elements that create the aura of grandeur and luxury and how to bring them into your home today.

    At it’s most basic level, what intrigues us about Downton Abbey is the feeling it evokes within our psyche, and emotions. The multiple layers of contrast and color beckon us to touch and feel everything; the strength and polish of the wood, the softness of a drapery, the playful dance of tassels against our fingers.  Taken out of context, a historical structure of a particular and familiar time, it might be too much of a good thing, simply sensory overload, or less kindly, gaudy and overdone.

   In order to adapt the essence of this era to the modern home one must examine the elements in relation to the individuals style and make choices that accentuate with subtlety, contrast dramatically, or fit naturally. The goal is not to replicate the style in it’s entirety but reinterpret it within today’s parameters of comfort, ease and luxury.

   If you are inclined to the modern, keep in mind the contrast of modern minimalist furnishings in a classical setting can be incredible stunning. Conversely high French and English antiques can be a visual marvel in an industrial loft.

   You are invited to peruse the elements listed below and pick and choose what works for you and your own particular Downton Abbey fantasy, and live the elegance…

Dowton Abbey Interior Style- The Elements

1. Flooring- 
            Wood floors and natural stone set the stage for room sized Oriental and Persian rugs. Deep jewel-tones, and rich vibrant highly saturated colors for drama in the public areas, softer in the bedrooms and more formal living spaces. For less traffic areas consider Aubusson rugs. Feel free to place smaller rugs over solid room size rugs, wall to wall carpet, or in very large rooms even over another rug! Persian and Oriental rugs can work in any style and add an immediate luxurious feel.

2. Walls- 
          Paint is the simplest way to bring the classically rich appeal to your own home. Kelly Moore has suggested colors as does Farrow and Ball based on rooms from the series. The colors range from deep mahogany brown to brick red in the library with the addition of blue by way of furnishings against cream walls with the book bindings taking on a pattern of their own. Green is introduced in small accent pieces on the mantle and on tables within the space. Stained wood trim and ceiling lend a more masculine chord in this area of the home. These colors will translate well to walls, ceiling, trim, built-ins, and doors in most homes and can be interchanged with varying degrees of emphasis based on personal preference. The dining room is essentially in the same or similar colors with cream walls and stained wood, with accent colors in the rug and the introduction of green on the dining chairs. This same palette is repeated in yet another form in the grande saloon, with its painted and glazed trims in cream, and highly decorative Spanish tooled leather walls, and the palette continues throughout the rest of the house.

            In the more formal sitting rooms, painted or lightly glazed off-white trim is used against softer creams, or pastels. The bedrooms are done in soft pastels with off-white trim, or stained wood with deeper greens, blues, and reds. With so many rooms, Downton Abbey can have an assortment of spaces with arguably masculine or feminine appeal. Take care in smaller homes not to "break up" your spaces by having too many too different, which will accentuate the size, as continuity will make it  feel larger. By following this formula of repetition of palette in different ways the old world elegance is readily applied to most any of today's spaces. For specific colors be sure to see the Kelly Moore Downton Abbey Colors compiled here and Farrow and Ball site, as well as the photos below. 

            Consider wallcoverings in large damask patterns, tone on tone stripes, and even painted embossed wallpapers. These embossed papers can be painted to resemble plaster, leather, wood, even metals. Embossed borders installed at chair rail height and bordered with a small molding, then painted and glazed to look like wood are a great way to add detail to walls. This is also workable on the wall at the ceiling.

3. Moldings, trim, doors, and built-ins-
            The stacked multi piece moldings, baseboards, and coffered beamed ceilings are a large part of the grand appeal of most all the rooms at the Abbey. They add a grounded impression that can easily be adapted. Changing a base molding from 4” to 6” in height will give a huge impact, even it’s only a 1 x 6 board with no routing. Beefing up all the moldings in your home is not inexpensive, but it is quite effective.

            Stained wood is also used extensively. If you have paint grade trims, this look can be created by painting doors and moldings in a wood-tone color. For richer depth the painted surfaces can be dry brushed with a darker glaze giving the effect of graining. This treatment is also very effective on built-ins.

            Adding crown molding formalizes any space, and if contrasted to the walls and ceilings it’s a lovely finishing touch. Picture molding used in conjunction with special hardware allows you to hang your art from chain or ribbon, this in itself is reminiscent of elegant English salons. Wainscoting is a wonderful way to add interest to a wall and a favorite of period designers and can used on single walls for an accent or focal point. Applied small moldings on plain walls can be used to mimic panels, and when painted in contrasting colors they are beautiful.

4. Ceilings-
            Many of the Abbeys ceilings have beams, or plaster embellishments. These can be added at any time to the surface. Any quality carpenter can add non structural decorative beams. There are companies that have been producing plaster ceiling elements for a hundred years, and many are still available, ranging from simple molding with corner curves to deep boxy angular ceilings with rosettes, and other carved motifs. For a simpler solution, use embossed wallpaper on ceilings installed within an inset formed by a small molding applied to the ceiling 12- 18” from the perimeter walls. Painted in a semi-gloss or gloss paint, the effect is that of formed plaster. Ceiling medallions at your chandeliers and other surface mount fixtures can be beautiful even with an otherwise plain ceiling. Another way to bring in the beautiful detailing is a painted stenciled ceiling. This can add creative and artistic patterns and depth and act as a "rug" for the ceiling. 

5. Furniture and furnishings-
            A wide assortment of period antiques, as if they had been collected over time, will always give a luxurious impression. Foregoing massive tables in living rooms in favor of smaller accent tables, and tufted ottomans as cocktail tables will work well. Center tables, and game tables are functional and decorative. Tufted furniture in general works, as do French and English fauteuils. Canopy beds come to mind as possibilities for bedrooms, along with carved exposed wood daybeds for secondary bedrooms and multipurpose rooms.

            Large framed mirrors in stained woods and gilded finishes are a must, and should be placed freely. From simple to highly adorned, they will work in traditional to modern spaces.

            Case pieces are usually highly decorated with carving, inlay or marquettry, or even painted. The addition of a few these exquisite pieces can transform a room immediately.
           
6. Fabrics-
            Texture, weave, luxury of hand, and light reflection are of utmost importance in the selection of fabrics and other textiles. Tone on tone damask is a staple for the opulent living room. Upholstering a sofa, or a pair of matching chairs in damask can set the tone for a living area, with embroidered or contrasting fabric fringed pillows as accents. Solid and cut velvet are a great choice for less formal areas. Tapestry fabrics also are wonderful choices. Fringe and trims can be added to most any pillow, or even as a skirt on a chair or sofa. Small textured geometric patterns can be used to complete the furnishings.

            Quilted silks are a favorite for the bedroom, as are brocades, velvets and tapestry fabrics. Large floral prints on windows are also quite lovely. Simple coverlets, or duvets with a restrained number of pillows, or large neckrolls at the head are preferable to the massive pillow stacks more common in today’s bedroom.  

            Large tapestries hung on the walls are simple way to add elegant rich and regal décor to a space. Available in many themes and weaves they work with all styles.

7. Lighting-
            Crystal chandeliers are the perfect choice for most any room if you want instant opulence. From large highly adorned pieces to the more delicate simple French flea market style with fewer crystals the selection is massive. Mirrored wall sconces, in fact wall sconces of any type, are also a perfect way to accent fireplaces, shelving, or add ambient lighting around the perimeter of a room. A pair of matching lamps on a console table or chest is great, but go more eclectic in pairing lamps on end tables or bedside tables by using a different style on each one. Remember a collection acquired over time. 

8. Windows-
            The layered swags, jabot and corniced windows of some of Downton Abbey's rooms do not translate well to the average home of today. They appear fussy and pretentious in most instances, unless your home is done in a very formal style with the accouterments to balance it. That said, the use of decorative hardware, especially wood rods with interesting finishes, finials and brackets can add the detailing we are after. Loose swags with panels and fringe can work, but be sure they are not too structured. Draw drapery to the ceiling under a simple upholstered or wood trimmed cornice, or on 2" wood rods with rings are the best option. 

            Luxurious fabrics, especially in silk, including velvet, damask, and stripes are great choices. Large florals in the bedrooms only. Fold over headings with fringe, or widely spaced rings with deep cuffed tops add a nice touch. Fringed inner hems and bottoms are an essential addition. Stationary or functional panels with tassels tiebacks, and tassel fringed bottom hems are highly dramatic. Length is everything. A small break at the hem is needed and puddling is a more luxurious look. Roller window shades in laminated accent fabrics with applied trims and fringe are a perfect partner to stationary panels, or for more light control with functional panels. 

            Roman shades are a more tailored choice and can be done in many beautiful fabrics to strengthen the overall décor. Steer clear of balloon or cloud shades as they are too fussy for the Downton style.

9. Accessories-
            Silver in decorative and functional pieces is perfect for this era’s influence. Silver serving pieces, tea sets and candelabra come to mind immediately. Books in shelving, and with bookends on surfaces are a must. Ceramic dogs, zebras, cheetahs, and other animals can be used on the floor as accents, typically about 24 to 30’ high. Ceramic jardinières, garden stools and vases in Chinese patterns can add color and also function as pedestals, planters or vases. Ornate framed paintings and tabletop framed photos of ancestors and family can be another way to bring the style into your home. Fresh floral and greenery are necessary additions. Fine china tea sets can be used to serve guests, especially Meissen and other classic china, this of course is more a lifestyle change than décor, but quite fitting nonetheless.

These are of course only basic guidelines. As I said above you can easily choose one or more to implement in your own spaces. Please scroll down for photos and more ideas.


via sousstyle.com

No doubt you recognize this photo as the formal dining room of Downton Abbey. The cream walls are set off by the warm oak trim and wainscoting. You can see the art is hung from a picture rail by chain. The windows are done in solid cream fabric with 4- 6" bouillon fringe at the bottom of a long gathered valance beneath an ornate gilded cornice. They are fully  functional draw drapery. The rug is in the rich reds, blues, creams and various similar tones of the main color palette of the home. Note the large candelabra style lamps on matching tables.


Dining room with paint colors
via hadleycourt.com

Another view of the dining room set for daily use by the family with a better view of the rug, along with Farrow and Ball paint colors.


http://sousstyle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/downton-abbey-saloon.png
via sousstyle.com

This is of course the grande saloon with it's incredible woodwork and Spanish tooled leather walls. Small tables are at each chair and there is a tufted ottoman in the middle. Sconces flanked the fireplace and more candelabra flank the arches.


http://sousstyle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/downton-abbey-music-room.png
via sousstyle.com

This is the music room with it's paneled walls with wallpaper inserts and painted and glazed woodwork. The dramatic contrast of the wallpaper might be a bit intense for your home, but a neutral damask pattern nearer the color value of the trim paint could be quite beautiful whether your trim is dark or light.


http://hadleycourt.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/libraryweb.png
via hadleycourt.com

The library seems to be a true favorite with it's bookshelves, and velvet seating. The ceiling here is a very intricate carved pattern and may be stained wood or plaster. Ceilings of this style can be purchased in pieces and installed on site. A full ceiling might be a bit much for you, and I have installed these in the center of bumped up ceilings in many homes, leaving the lower area plain with great success as well as complete rooms. The color palette used throughout is most evident here in the furnishings and rugs, with green accents on the table at right, and on the mantle, most likely malachite pieces. An oversized geometric rug covers most of the room, while a smaller Persian rug defines the seating area. You can see the upholstered box cornice with tied back draw drapery in the distance. The Farrow and Ball colors inspired by this room are shown at the top right.


http://hadleycourt.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/dowton4web.png
via hadleycourt.com

Another favorite room Lady Cora, The Duchess of Grantham's bedroom. A lovely pastel blue with matching painted trim, and detailed white ceiling and fireplace surround. A large solid carpet covers the floor with smaller area rug on top. A canopy bed with fabric accents, quilted silk coverlet, and minimal pillows offer restrained elegance. A large gilded mirror over the mantle and sconces either side add light and sparkle.  Matching gold table lamps with embroidered shades light a desk area. Draw drapery with tassels along the inside hem and silk tiebacks adorn the window. Kelly Moore paint color in bottom right.



http://sousstyle.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/downton-abbey-light-green-living2.png
via sousstyle.com

One of my favorite rooms Lady Grantham's drawing room feels like a spring breeze. Painted and glazed off white woodwork, and pale green damask wallcovering above painted wainscoting feel fresh and will work easily in the modern home. Even without the appliqued adornments lightly glazed trims are beautiful. The matching sofa and chair in peach damask set a serene tone, and tapestry fabrics on the chairs, and embroidered pillows complete the look. The rich patterned rug is a perfect stage for the setting and the massive crystal chandelier sparkles above catching the light. The window treatments are perfect in this room, but a bit too formal for most spaces these days.


Downton Abbey damask walls with Aubusson
via pbs.org

Yet another drawing room with painted and glazed wainscoting and damask patterned wallcovering with a gorgeous Aubusson rug. Note the detailed ornate cabinet.


Glazed painted woodwork detail
via Kelly Moore Paint and California Coatings

Detail of modern day painted and glazed or gilded carved trim. This effect can be reproduced on embossed wallpaper as well.


Glazed embossed wallcovering
via mekhart.blogspot.com

Example of embossed wallpaper painted then faux finished. This could be verdi gris oxidized metal.

Glazed wallcovering
via thesteampunkhome,blogspot.com

Another embossed pattern painted to look like deep red leather.


Edith Wharton's The Mount
via pbc style

This lovely room is from Edith Wharton's home The Mount, that could easily be in Downton Abbey. The large tapestry acts as a focal point and adds color and interest. Tapestries are one of the best ways to add rich color and texture to any room. The pale blue walls with the applied white moldings can easily be adapted for any space as well as adding formality. The scale of all the furnishings are perfect for the Downton style, especially the small accent tables, and multiple seating areas.


Davenport Village Entry Hall
Interior Design by PL&D/Patrick Landrum Design

A tapestry behind a highly ornate chest, carved high back chair, leather inlaid center table and stenciling add regal touches to this entry foyer.

Large tapestry in dining room
via tapestries-inc.com

This dining room console table needs nothing more to complete the look.


Current sitting room with oriental rug
via myhomeideas.com

This smaller sized sitting room could easily be in your neighbors home, but has elements of Downton style.  The Oriental rug adds the color and pattern, while a pair of matching chairs, and a wing back chair flank the a console table. Each seat has a table to use, and another table and chairs can be used for games.

Stencil painted cieling
via zitaarttexas.com

Painted stenciled ceilings can act as "rugs" for the ceiling and make statements on their own.


via zitaarttexas.com

Stenciled detailing on cabinetry and other furniture pieces can add interest and create one of a kind showpieces.


Stenciled border at ceiling
via zitaarttexas.com

Another example of stencil painting on a cabinet and on the wall and trim as a crown treatment. Free hanging mirrors with sconces over vanities and over chests and console pieces are an important element for Downton Style and can be used anywhere.


Mueller Dining Room
Interior Design and custom designed chandelier by PL&D/Patrick Landrum Design
photo credit Bryant Hill

The minimalist loft dining room above blends rustic style with luxurious elements for a stark stunning study in contrast. The oak farm chairs are upholstered in a chocolate brown taffeta with the damask pattern woven in moss velvet. The seats are a tweed chenille. A bench matching the reclaimed wood table serves as seating on the near side. The chandelier was custom designed by the designer for the space and is silver leafed iron with clear baguette, octagonal, and almond shaped crystals, with larger almond rock crystal accents. The aged gold leaf carved mirror completes the look with the essence of Downton Abbey style.